C.H. Spurgeon

Sinners, let me address you with words of life; Jesus wants nothing from you, nothing whatsoever, nothing done, nothing felt; he gives both work and feeling. Ragged, penniless, just as you are, lost, forsaken, desolate, with no good feelings, and no good hopes, still Jesus comes to you, and in these words of pity he addresses you, "Him that cometh unto me I will in no wise cast out."

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Friday, October 17, 2008

Genesis 38, Judgment Upon Onan

Recently a commenter has become most infatuated with Genesis chapter 38 within the Scriptures, though they do not even believe in God and consider the Bible to be archaic. Not only have they created an entire post to it on their blog, they have repeatedly made reference to it on mine. *Christian reader be warned before visiting their blog*

The story concerns Judah and his children Er, Onan, and Shelah. Er, the eldest son, had taken Tamar to wife. Before Tamar could bear him a son, Er was slain by God because of his wickedness. The Scriptures do not tell us what Er did, but that he ‘was wicked in the sight of the LORD; and the LORD slew him.’

Some claim the firstborn, who here was Er, would receive two-thirds of the inheritance (which would have the siblings share the other third), whereas others claim they would be given a double portion over the other siblings. They were usually considered ‘the first of the strength’ of the father. Let it suffice to say that the first male child was held in the highest regard.

‘Judah said unto Onan, Go in unto thy brother's wife, and marry her, and raise up seed to thy brother. And Onan knew that the seed should not be his; and it came to pass, when he went in unto his brother's wife, that he spilled it on the ground, lest that he should give seed to his brother. And the thing which he did displeased the LORD: wherefore he slew him also.’

Apparently, here at verse 9 is where the commenter has his problem with God and Scripture. Was Onan really slain because ‘he spilled it on the ground’ or was there something more? Onan directly rebelled against the voice of his father, for Onan knew if Tamar bore a son he would be heir to his brother Er and not himself. This assumingly would move the child into the greater inheritance being counted as the son of Er the firstborn, where Onan would then remain under him.

The judgment upon Onan deals more with his deceit and rebellion than the physical act in the account. He pretended to obey his father by going into his brother’s wife to bare his brother seed, yet did it not. As with all sin, it is a heart matter before it portrays itself in a physical action.

Though many would like to gloat over the mentioning of unsightly things recorded in the Scriptures, the inclusion of such within the Bible is to be an example for all of us as to the depravity of man and the repercussions of sin. ‘For the wages of sin is death; but the gift of God is eternal life through Jesus Christ our Lord.’


Note: If any reader wishes to comment, please ensure the proper etiquette if you wish for your remarks to be posted. You do not have to agree, but they must be made in good taste and minus vulgarity.

6 comments:

BEAST FCD said...

"Note: If any reader wishes to comment, please ensure the proper etiquette if you wish for your remarks to be posted. You do not have to agree, but they must be made in good taste and minus vulgarity."

Allow me to laugh: This chapter was definitely written in bad taste.

You also forgot to mention that Judah did indeed had sex with Tamar, who later bore her twins.

And no where in this chapter was there any mention of rebellion. If you read closely enough, Onan was actually quite reluctant to bear a son for Judah, because he knew the son would not be his. It is Onan who is virtuous in this case, and Judah who thinks otherwise.

Read carefully.

Beast FCD

BEAST FCD said...

Ok, Tim, allow me to ask you a question:

Will you have sex with your brother's wife, assuming your brother dies, and your father asks you to?

Doesn't make a lot of sense, does it? And what if, if you refuse to have sex with her, God deems you guilty of rebellion?

I am curious, Tim. Tell me what you think. And don't try to get away with the "Oh this is the Old Covenant" excuse. Its getting stale.

Beast FCD

Writer, Splinters of Silver.com said...

Beast,

It matters less what I think and more what Scripture declares. You are welcome to believe what you will concerning Genesis 38, but it changes not that we are all sinners and 'the wages of sin is death; but the gift of God is eternal life through Jesus Christ our Lord.’

Tim

BEAST FCD said...

Again, you are avoiding the question: Will you or will you not?

And once again, you seem not to understand the bible you hold so dearly on to.

Onan quite clearly offended God when he refused to impregnate his sister in law. And the story ends with Judah having sex with his daughter in law, Tamar, who ends up bearing him 2 children.

Is this a biblical example of morality? Sharing a woman amongst brothers and fathers?

Beast FCD

Writer, Splinters of Silver.com said...

Beast,

You write, ‘Onan quite clearly offended God when he refused to impregnate his sister in law.’

So, now you agree with my assessment of the context, in that I said, ‘The judgment upon Onan deals more with his deceit and rebellion than the physical act in the account.’ It wasn’t as much as HOW he ‘refused’ to obey, but that he DID rebel.

As for as your comment, ‘And the story ends with Judah having sex with his daughter in law, Tamar, who ends up bearing him 2 children’ - this is simply the Scriptures account of the sin of Judah. Even Judah says, ‘She hath been more righteous than I.’

You ask, ‘Is this a biblical example of morality?’ The act of rebellion and the act of fornication are both sin, and therefore immoral acts which need to be repented of to a holy God.

You asked, ‘Will you have sex with your brother's wife, assuming your brother dies, and your father asks you to?’ As you know, modern science has the ability for one to give such an heir without such an act. And I don’t believe it is until Leviticus 18 and 20 the law is given.

Tim

BEAST FCD said...

LOL!!! You finally replied. I thought you were dead!!!!

First of all, the perceived "rebellion": Judah gave a really bad call by telling Onan to impregnate Tamar. After all, you can't simply use your brother's sperm to impregnate your wife and deem it yours. It defies logic. Onan knew it, and he wanted to refuse it, but he did it anyway to placate his father, but he "pulled out" and made the Sky Daddy angry. Was it a clear act of rebellion? No. It was an act of indecision.

Indeed, Tamar is a righteous sex machine, having become sexually submission to Judah and his two deceased sons.

The only immoral act I see is the idea of screwing your sister in law after the death of your brother. The other more criminal act would be the murder of someone who practices birth control.

Oh now you are supportive of science, oh you science hater? In the context of the bible, Onan could have conceivably marry another woman, didn't he? But Judah's stark mad. He probably suffers from a delusional problem, or Tamar is a real hottie like Monica Bellucci.

Again, Tim, you get your bible out of context. Quit your pastor job and start selling pencils from a paper cup.

Beast FCD

John Bunyan

To be saved is to be preserved in the faith to the end. 'He that shall endure unto the end, the same shall be saved.' (Mt. 24:13) Not that perseverance is an accident in Christianity, or a thing performed by human industry; they that are saved 'are kept by the power of God, through faith unto salvation.' (1 Pet. 1: 3-6) But perseverance is absolutely necessary to the complete saving of the soul…. He that goeth to sea with a purpose to arrive at Spain, cannot arrive there if he be drowned by the way; wherefore perseverance is absolutely necessary to the saving of the soul.