C.H. Spurgeon

Sinners, let me address you with words of life; Jesus wants nothing from you, nothing whatsoever, nothing done, nothing felt; he gives both work and feeling. Ragged, penniless, just as you are, lost, forsaken, desolate, with no good feelings, and no good hopes, still Jesus comes to you, and in these words of pity he addresses you, "Him that cometh unto me I will in no wise cast out."

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Monday, September 10, 2007

Critical Teardown versus Constructive Criticism

To criticize someone is quite easy to do. All one must do is observe another person long enough, and we could quickly become critical of that person, their ideas and their actions. If we take notice of ourselves, we may find that this practice, most often, comes about when we do not particular like a person, when we are jealous of this person, or when we simply just think mighty highly of ourselves over another person; especially in times that we may find ourselves disagreeing with this person, whereas others (we wish were on our side) lean more toward them, rather than us.

The problem with being entirely critical of someone else (deeds or actions), is that, in and of itself, does not bring forth anything positive or productive for the one we view with a critical eye, nor for our own humility, nor for those which observe our gossip of the situation from the sidelines.

Criticizing and being critical of another, again, is easy to do, and is sometimes done without even taking thought to the fact that it is being done. Especially when one is fixed upon boosting their own self pride and image, we may fail to see the destructive nature in simply having the critical eye fixed upon everyone but ourselves.

Constructive Criticism, on the other hand, can be both positive and productive, to both the one and the other, and their relationship. This not only points out a “negative”, but gives a “positive” solution to help improve and/or correct; therefore, helping an individual better themselves (physically, emotionally, spiritually) with encouragement from one they can trust, because the person has shown a love and desire for the improvement of the person, and not simply a selfish desire to merely point out their “flaws”, to only have themselves appear better, can be beneficial to all persons.

We all have places that need constructive criticism, from a pure heart, with a pure desire to want us to succeed in growing as persons and Christians.

Scripture declares, “Brethren, if a man be overtaken in a fault, ye which are spiritual, restore such an one in the spirit of meekness; considering thyself, lest thou also be tempted.” Meekness: “humbly patient; longsuffering”

Put on therefore, as the elect of God, holy and beloved, bowels of mercies, kindness, humbleness of mind, meekness, longsuffering; Forbearing one another, and forgiving one another, if any man have a quarrel against any: even as Christ forgave you, so also do ye.”

Next time you look around that beam, take a moment to see if you are about to perform a Critical Teardown versus Constructive Criticism.

5 comments:

evelyn h. said...

I have found that, quite often, what I don't like about someone is often the very thing in myself that needs changing.

For instance, I once complained to someone that I didn't like a particular someone else because that person was far too dramatic for me. My friend burst out laughing and pointed out my own drama. It gave me serious pause for thought.

Writer, Splinters of Silver.com said...

I have found that, quite often, what I don't like about someone is often the very thing in myself that needs changing.

Funny [well, not really] how that is usually the case, isn't it?

Tim

Sista Cala said...

Excellent post. It is something that needs to be written into the "introduction to blogging" if there is such a thing. In reading around the blogosphere, I find many comments are critical. Sometimes it is very obvious that the comments were meant to be harmful. Other times, I think it is just a lack of communication skills. When there are no non-verbal cues to assess, we must be very clear w/our written messages.

Blog Guy said...

We discussed this in counseling. Being critical is a quick way to destroy others and yourself. It is poison. Lets say you and your wife have been fighting alot lately and you tell everyone you know about your dirty laundry and only about the bad about her. After a while, the people you talk to will only see the bad in that her. No one wants to be around a person who is always critical of everything all the time.It contaminates people.
The best way to not be so critical of people and things is to look for the positive and tell others about it. If you bad mouth anything long enough it becomes bad to you and to others. This works the other way. if you are always positive about something or some one you, see the beauty in people and things.
Constructive criticism can be great but it should be done in the most private manner with calm, and the best intentions possible. If I am sinning and others see it then I want to be called on it ,but not before the entire village where they all can chuck stones at me. There is a time, a place, and a way to do it.
Great post. I throughly enjoyed it.

Writer, Splinters of Silver.com said...

It is something that needs to be written into the "introduction to blogging" if there is such a thing.

If I am sinning and others see it then I want to be called on it ,but not before the entire village where they all can chuck stones at me. There is a time, a place, and a way to do it.

I agree. Thanks for the comments.

Tim

John Bunyan

To be saved is to be preserved in the faith to the end. 'He that shall endure unto the end, the same shall be saved.' (Mt. 24:13) Not that perseverance is an accident in Christianity, or a thing performed by human industry; they that are saved 'are kept by the power of God, through faith unto salvation.' (1 Pet. 1: 3-6) But perseverance is absolutely necessary to the complete saving of the soul…. He that goeth to sea with a purpose to arrive at Spain, cannot arrive there if he be drowned by the way; wherefore perseverance is absolutely necessary to the saving of the soul.