C.H. Spurgeon

Sinners, let me address you with words of life; Jesus wants nothing from you, nothing whatsoever, nothing done, nothing felt; he gives both work and feeling. Ragged, penniless, just as you are, lost, forsaken, desolate, with no good feelings, and no good hopes, still Jesus comes to you, and in these words of pity he addresses you, "Him that cometh unto me I will in no wise cast out."

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Thursday, December 06, 2007

Is Santa Wearing Hunter’s Red?

Couldn’t help but laugh at the article I was just sent.

Apparently one guy in his spirit of Christmas has decided to put up wooden cutouts of Santa pointing a rifle at Rudolph. Not sure as to what the red-nosed reindeer has done, but apparently, “The Caillouets have been putting up their tongue-in-cheek display for seven years, and in that time, it's caused quite a stir.”

I guess even non-religious stuff like Santa Claus and Rudolph can cause debate at Christmas time! Who’s to say Santa doesn’t shoot reindeer in the off-season? Hahaha!

Hmmm, here is a thought: Do atheist parents allow their children to believe in Santa?

9 comments:

Anonymous said...

Why not? What does Santa have to do with religion? Santa is a jolly old man who brings toys and presents to children, and has absolutely nothing to do with the birth of Jesus or anything. It's the same with the Easter Bunny. There's no correlation between Jesus dying on the cross and coloured eggs or jellybeans. Secular families can have just as deep, meaningful and tradition-filled holidays as religious ones, just for different reasons.

Writer, Splinters of Silver.com said...

I asked because Santa is no different than fairies and unicorns, which are also against reason and fact. I was just wondering if those that sometimes give Christians a hard time for living a life filled with having faith in God (one whom atheists claim is not real) would subject their children to a lie of Santa Claus or Easter Bunny. Kind of hypocritical isn't it?

For the record, I don’t believe we as Christians need to be promoting Santa and the Easter Bunny either, especially if the real reason for these two holidays are to celebrate the birth and resurrection of our Savior Jesus Christ.

This is not to say that Christian and non-Christian families cannot enjoy a tradition-filled holiday.

BEAST said...

The only hypocrite, Tim, is you, as I pointed out repeatedly in the past.

First things first: Christmas and Easter are pagan holidays. The Christian Emperor Constantine stole them and placed them under the banner of christianity.

As for Santa Claus and Easter Bunny,one must get this straight: This are made belief characters: No one will kill another person because of santa (not that I heard of) or for the matter, the easter bunny. But people do kill in the name of Gods, Jebuses, Allahs and some other deities.

Tim, if you cannot articulate your arguments, then you might ask someone to do it for you. You are putting your christian compatriots to shame. I have debated with many christians, and you really are the worst of the lot.

Beast

Writer, Splinters of Silver.com said...

Beast,

Wasn't it you that said: [here]

"Christians, in particular, attribute this trait to a "born again" phenomenon: By being a born-again Christian, a person begins to surrender his or her thinking faculties with regards to the deity in question, and in tandem with his or her infantile roots, the born again Christian assumes the same beliefs and behavioral instincts of a infant."

If you are going to compare Christianity with merely Christians being unable to let go of our childhood beliefs of "Father Santa" then maybe atheists shouldn't allow their children to believe in him.

Tim

BEAST said...

Tim

There you go,taking my words out of context.

Never in my post did I say that atheist kids cannot enjoy Father Santas. The problem comes when people take infantile like beliefs and imagine them to be real.

Separating fact and fiction does not mean that kids cannot enjoy a harmless spot of fun once in a while.

You have indeed proven yourself to be a hypocrite of a man. Shame of you, for you are supposed to be a teacher of kids and a self proclaimed bastion of morals. What kind of morals are you imparting to the kids in your class? Do you have any sense of shame left in your religiously skewered brain?

Beast

Writer, Splinters of Silver.com said...

Did I say that you "say that atheist kids cannot enjoy Father Santas" in your post? After review of my comment I don’t see that I did. And further more, I presented the link for all to read for a complete context.

As for as context, your context is most clear to any that will read your post. I quote again from such:

“In a bid to hold onto this historical piece of ourselves, many adults have taken to faith to fulfill a void left behind by our departure from our wry imaginations. God, it seems, becomes the summation of this lost character we look up to in childhood: Peter Pan and his magical abilities, Father Santa and his awe-inspiring ability to deliver presents to every children on the planet. These are omnipotent, omniscient and benevolent qualities we have, at some stage of our infantile lives, attached to our imaginary friends, and for some, the attraction and comfort derived from this seemingly harmless virtue is too difficult to resist.” bold added

So again I repeat that which I questioned in my last comment, “If you are going to compare Christianity with merely Christians being unable to let go of our childhood beliefs of "Father Santa" then maybe atheists shouldn't allow their children to believe in him.” Shall I add then Peter Pan also?

If your conclusion is merely that millions of persons (labeled as Christian of faith) cannot get over their childhood imaginations such as Santa Claus, and thousands of other things, then surely you must conclude that the atheist must withhold such imaginary things from their children to ensure that their children do not turn to God in a way simply to fulfill the void left there by such as they grow older.

Your argument fails, and thus is why you apparently do not understand my use of it now.

Tim

BEAST said...

Tim

Please do not insult my intelligence.

You said:

"If you are going to compare Christianity with merely Christians being unable to let go of our childhood beliefs of "Father Santa" then maybe atheists shouldn't allow their children to believe in him."

Clearly, you are using my post to insinuate that based on my arguments, fantasies of the Peter Pans and Santa Claus varieties have no place in an atheist's upbringing. If that is not what you mean, then clearly you are not living on this planet.

& more insinuations of this sort in your latest comment:

"If your conclusion is merely that millions of persons (labeled as Christian of faith) cannot get over their childhood imaginations such as Santa Claus, and thousands of other things, then surely you must conclude that the atheist must withhold such imaginary things from their children to ensure that their children do not turn to God in a way simply to fulfill the void left there by such as they grow older."

Don't try to lie in my face, Tim. I assure you cannot get away with it.

I sometimes wonder if you have a serious comprehension problem, so let me clarify my stance again:

Fairy tales of the Peter Pan sort are good fiction. Fictional characters of these sort are valued precisely because they stimulate the imagination, and good parents should know that books, such as the Golden Compass and Harry Potter varieties, have great entertainment value.

The trouble comes when an adult who harbors childish beliefs cannot separate fact from fiction.

Tim, my argument does not fail. It is you who fail to comprehend (as usual) my writings, because your language skills are too poor.

Go back to elementary school before you even dare debate with me.I will pulverize your arguments anytime, any place, anywhere.

Beast

Writer, Splinters of Silver.com said...

Beast,

This will be my last attempt as to help you understand my comments. I shall comment no further.

As you note in your posts, comments, and here with “The trouble comes when an adult who harbors childish beliefs cannot separate fact from fiction” it is clear that you assume that [1] some persons are unable to remove themselves from the imaginary things (such as Santa) they enjoyed as children, which [2] cause some to trust in God by faith, so the [3] conclusion is since you do not know who will or will not seek faith in God as an adult to fill the void of their childhood imagination, it would [4] be best to never circum any child (especially of an Atheist) to imagination (Santa) at all, thus (5) giving them a lesser chance of becoming a Christian.

This is simply based off of your concept of - "many adults have taken to faith to fulfill a void left behind by our departure from our wry imaginations. God, it seems, becomes the summation of this lost character we look up to in childhood" -, and failing argument.

Tim

BEAST said...

Aw...the all almighty Tim is at it again.

I do not "assume" that a belief in God is a indirect result of childhood fantasy: It is a fact that childhood fantasy do cross over to adults who cannot differentiate fact from fiction.

The conclusions you made from point 3 to point 5 are your conclusions and not mine, so do not put words in my mouth.

Beast

John Bunyan

To be saved is to be preserved in the faith to the end. 'He that shall endure unto the end, the same shall be saved.' (Mt. 24:13) Not that perseverance is an accident in Christianity, or a thing performed by human industry; they that are saved 'are kept by the power of God, through faith unto salvation.' (1 Pet. 1: 3-6) But perseverance is absolutely necessary to the complete saving of the soul…. He that goeth to sea with a purpose to arrive at Spain, cannot arrive there if he be drowned by the way; wherefore perseverance is absolutely necessary to the saving of the soul.